An Argument with Michael Marmot

About two decades ago I went head-to-head in an argument with the great Michael Marmot at the Medical Research Council. The topic of conversation was information that should be routinely collected in randomised trials. Marmot was arguing that social class and economic information should be collected. He made a valid point that these things are correlated with outcomes. I pointed out that although they may be correlated with outcomes, they were not necessarily correlated with treatment effects. Then came Marmot’s killer argument. Marmot asked whether I thought that sex and ethnic group should be collected. When I admitted that they should be, he rounded on me, saying that this proves his point. We met only recently and he remembered the argument and stood by his point. However, it turns out that it is not really important to collect information on the sex after all. Wallach and colleagues, writing in the BMJ,[1] cite evidence from meta-analyses of RCTs to show that sex makes no difference to treatment effects when averaged across all studies. So there we have it, a parsimonious data set is optimal for trial purposes, since it increases the likelihood of collecting essential information to measure the parameter of interest.

— Richard Lilford, CLAHRC WM Director

Reference:

  1. Wallach JD, Sullivan PG, Trepanowski JF, Steyerberg EW, Ioannidis JPA. Sex based subgroup differences in randomized controlled trials: empirical evidence from Cochrane meta-analyses. BMJ. 2016; 355: i5826.

 

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