More on Medical School Admission

I thank Celia Taylor for drawing my attention to an important paper on the relationship between personality test results, and cognitive and non-cognitive outcomes at medical school.[1] Everyone accepts that being a good doctor is about much more than cognitive excellence. That isn’t the question. The question is how to select for salient non-cognitive attributes? The paper is a hard read because one must first learn the acronyms for all the explanatory and outcome tests. So let the News Blog take the strain!

The study uses a database containing entry level personality scores, which were not used in selection, and outcomes following medical training. To cut a long story short “none of the non-cognitive tests evaluated in this study has been shown to have sufficient utility to be used in medical student selection.” And, of course, even if a better test is found in the future, it may perform differently when used as part of a selection process than when used for scientific purposes. I stick by the conclusions that Celia and I published in the BMJ many years ago [2]; until a test is devised that predicts non-cognitive medical skills, and assuming that cognitive ability is not negatively associated with non-cognitive attributes, we should select purely on academic ability. I await your vituperative comments! In the meantime can I suggest a research idea – correlate cognitive performance with the desirable compassionate skills we would like to see in our doctor. Maybe the correlation is positive, such that the more intelligent the person, the more likely they are to demonstrate compassion and patience in their dealings with patients.

— Richard Lilford, CLAHRC WM Director

References:

  1. MacKenzie RK, Dowell J, Ayansina D, Cleland JA. Do personality traits assessed on medical school admission predict exit performance? A UK-wide longitudinal cohort study. Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract. 2017; 22(2): 365-85.
  2. Brown CA, & Lilford RJ. Selecting medical students. BMJ. 2008; 336: 786.
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