An Interesting Report of Quality of Care Enhancement Strategies Across England, Germany, Sweden, the Netherlands, and the USA

An interesting paper from the Berlin University of Technology compares the quality enhancement systems across the above countries with respect to measuring, reporting and rewarding quality.[1] This paper is an excellent resource for policy and health service researchers. The US has the most developed system of quality-related payments (P4P) of the five countries. England wisely uses only process measures to reward performance, while the US and Germany include patient outcomes. The latter are unfair because of signal to noise issues,[2] and the risk-adjustment fallacy.[3] [4] Above all, remember Lilford’s axiom – never base rewards or sanctions on a measurement over which service providers do not feel they have control.[5] It is true, as the paper argues, that rates of adherence to a single process seldom correlate with outcome. But this is a signal to noise problem. ‘Proving’ that processes are valid takes huge RCTs, even when the process is applied to 0% (control arm) vs. approaching 100% (intervention arm) of patients. So how could an improvement from say 40% to 60% in adherence to clinical process show up in routinely collected data?[6] I have to keep on saying it – collect outcome data, but in rewarding or penalising institutions on the basis of comparative performance – process, process, process.

— Richard Lilford, CLAHRC WM Director

References:

  1. Pross C, Geissler A, Busse R. Measuring, Reporting, and Rewarding Quality of Care in 5 Nations: 5 Policy Levers to Enhance Hospital Quality Accountability. Milbank Quart. 2017; 95(1): 136-83.
  2. Girling AJ, Hofer TP, Wu J, et al. Case-mix adjusted hospital mortality is a poor proxy for preventable mortality: a modelling study. BMJ Qual Saf. 2012; 21: 1052-6.
  3. Mohammed MA, Deeks JJ, Girling A, et al. Evidence of methodological bias in hospital standardised mortality ratios: retrospective database study of English hospitals. BMJ. 2009; 338: b780.
  4. Lilford R, & Pronovost P. Using hospital mortality rates to judge hospital performance: a bad idea that just won’t go away. BMJ. 2010; 340: c2016.
  5. Lilford RJ. Important evidence on pay for performance. NIHR CLAHRC West Midlands News Blog. 20 November 2015.
  6. Lilford RJ, Chilton PJ, Hemming K, Girling AJ, Taylor CA, Barach P. Evaluating policy and service interventions: framework to guide selection and interpretation of study end points. BMJ. 2010; 341: c4413.
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