Another Interesting Trial of an Educational Intervention – This Time Concerning Access

Young people from disadvantaged backgrounds are less likely to apply to elite universities, both in the UK and the US, than those from economically better-off backgrounds. This finding applies even after controlling for exam results prior to application – i.e. the GCSE results in England. So Sanders and co-authors from the Behavioural Insights Team and the English Department for Education did an inexpensive trial of an inexpensive intervention.[1] The outcomes were application to, and acceptance into, an elite university (defined as belonging to the Russell Group). The intervention consisted of a letter sent to students from disadvantaged backgrounds who were on track to attend an elite university given their GCSE grades. Eligible schools were randomised to control conditions or one of three interventions: to receive a letter written by a pseudonymous male student (Ben) at Bristol University on Department for Education note paper; to receive a similar letter from a female student (Rachel) at the same university; or to receive letters from both Ben and Rachel. Three hundred schools (clusters) and 11,104 students participated. It was then a simple matter to collect the outcomes from the agency that supervises the admission process (the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service, UCAS). Receipt of a letter was associated with a non-significant increase in applications, and eventual admission to, an elite university. The increase was greatest and statistically significant for students who received both letters – from 8.5% acceptance among controls, to 11.4% in the ‘double dose’ intervention group – an increase of 2.9 percentage points (or 34 percent relative risk). Certainly, these results add to growing evidence concerning aspirations in education – see recent News Blogs on keeping children back a year [2], streaming [3], and the Michelle Obama effect.[4]

— Richard Lilford, CLAHRC WM Director

References:

  1. Sanders M, Chande R, Selley E. Encouraging People into University. London: Department for Education; 2017.
  2. Lilford RJ. Keeping a Child Back at School. NIHR CLAHRC West Midlands News Blog. 10 March 2017.
  3. Lilford RJ. Evidence-Based Education (or How Wrong the CLAHRC WM Director was). NIHR CLAHRC West Midlands News Blog. 15 July 2016.
  4. Lilford RJ. More on Education. NIHR CLAHRC West Midlands News Blog. 16 September 2016.
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