Patient and Public Involvement: Direct Involvement of Patient Representatives in Data Collection

It is widely accepted that the public and patient voice should be heard loud and clear in the selection of studies, in the design of those studies, and in the interpretation and dissemination of the findings. But what about involvement of patient and the public in the collection of data? Before science became professionalised, all scientists could have been considered members of the public. Robert Hooke, for example, could have called himself architect, philosopher, physicist, chemist, or just Hooke. Today, the public are involved in data collection in many scientific enterprises. For example, householders frequently contribute data on bird populations, and Prof Brian Cox involved the public in the detection of new planets in his highly acclaimed television series. In medicine, patients have been involved in collecting data; for example patients with primary biliary cirrhosis were the data collectors in a randomised trial.[1] However, the topic of public and patient involvement in data collection is deceptively complex. This is because there are numerous procedural safeguards governing access to users of the health service and that restrict disbursement of the funds that are used to pay for research.

Let us consider first the issue of access to patients. It is not permissible to collect research data without undergoing certain procedural checks; in the UK it is necessary to be ratified by the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) and to have necessary permissions from the institutional authorities. You simply cannot walk onto a hospital ward and start handing out questionnaires or collecting blood samples.

Then there is the question of training. Before collecting data from patients it is necessary to be trained in how to do so, covering both salient ethical and scientific principles. Such training is not without its costs, which takes us to the next issue.

Researchers are paid for their work and, irrespective of whether the funds are publically or privately provided, access to payment is governed by fiduciary and equality/diversity legislation and guidelines. Access to scarce resources is usually governed by some sort of competitive selection process.

None of the above should be taken as an argument against patients and the public taking part in data collection. It does, however, mean that this needs to be a carefully managed process. Of course things are very much simpler if access to patients is not required. For example, conducting a literature survey would require only that the person doing it was technically competent and in many cases members of the public would already have all, or some, of the necessary skills. I would be very happy to collaborate with a retired professor of physics (if anyone wants to volunteer!). But that is not the point. The point is that procedural safeguards must be applied, and this entails management structures that can manage the process.

Research may be carried out by accessing members of the public who are not patients, or at least who are not accessed through the health services. As far as I know there are no particular restrictions on doing so, and I guess that such contact is governed by the common law covering issues such as privacy, battery, assault, and so on. The situation becomes different, however, if access is achieved through a health service organisation, or conducted on behalf of an institution, such as a university. Then presumably any member of the public wishing to collect data from other members of the public would fall under the governance arrangements of the relevant institution. The institution would have to ensure not only that the study was ethical, but that the data-collectors had the necessary skills and that funds were disbursed in accordance with the law. Institutions already deploy ‘freelance’ researchers, so I presume that the necessary procedural arrangements are already in place.

This analysis was stimulated by a discussion in the PPI committee of CLAHRC West Midlands, and represents merely my personal reflections based on first principles. It does not represent my final, settled position, let alone that of the CLAHRC WM, or any other institution. Rather it is an invitation for further comment and analysis.

— Richard Lilford, CLAHRC WM Director

Reference:

  1. Browning J, Combes B, Mayo MJ. Long-term efficacy of sertraline as a treatment for cholestatic pruritus in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. Am J Gastroenterol. 2003; 98: 2736-41.
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3 thoughts on “Patient and Public Involvement: Direct Involvement of Patient Representatives in Data Collection”

  1. It still amazes me that, compared to almost any other industry, the healthcare industry makes so very little use of my ability as a patient to enter data about myself directly onto a computer system.

    What I might enter about myself may not always be as accurate as that carefully documented by the all knowing, highly trained professional, but if so why, everywhere I go, do I have to fill in yet another form, for someone, often funded by the taxpayer, so that, if the secretary can read my writing, he/she can enter then the medical and social information I have supplied on paper into yet another incompatible electronic database

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