Introducing Hospital IT systems – Two Cautionary Tales

The beneficial effects of mature IT systems, such as at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital,[1] Intermountain Health Care,[2] and University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust,[3] have been well documented. But what happens when a commercial system is popped into a busy NHS general hospital? Lots of problems according to two detailed qualitative studies from Edinburgh.[4] [5] Cresswell and colleagues document problems with both stand-alone ePrescribing systems and with multi-modular systems.[4] The former drive staff crazy with multiple log-ins and duplicate data entry. Nor does their frustration lessen with time. Neither system types (stand-alone or multi-modular) presented a comprehensive overview of the patient record. This has obvious implications for patient safety. How is a doctor expected to detect a pattern in the data if they are not presented in a coherent format? In their second paper the authors examine how staff cope with the above problems.[5] To enable them to complete their tasks ‘workarounds’ were deployed. These workarounds frequently involved recourse to paper intermediaries. Staff often became overloaded with work and often did not have the necessary clinical information at their fingertips. Some workarounds were sanctioned by the organisation, others not. What do I make of these disturbing, but thorough, pieces of research? I would say four things:

  1. Move slowly and carefully when introducing IT and never, never go for heroic ‘big bang’ solutions.
  2. Employ lots of IT specialists who can adapt systems to people – do not try to go the other way round and eschew ‘business process engineering’, the risks of which are too high – be incremental.
  3. If you do not put the doctors in charge, make sure that they feel as if they are. More seriously – take your people with you.
  4. Forget integrating primary and secondary care, and social care and community nurses, and meals on wheels and whatever else. Leave that hubristic task to your hapless successor and introduce a patient held booklet made of paper – that’s WISDAM.[6]

— Richard Lilford, CLAHRC WM Director

References:

  1. Weissman JS, Vogeli C, Fischer M, Ferris T, Kaushal R, Blumenthal B. E-prescribing Impact on Patient Safety, Use and Cost. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2007.
  2. Bohmer RMJ, Edmondson AC, Feldman L. Intermountain Health Care. Harvard Business School Case 603-066. 2002
  3. Coleman JJ, Hodson J, Brooks HL, Rosser D. Missed medication doses in hospitalised patients: a descriptive account of quality improvement measures and time series analysis. Int J Qual Health Care. 2013; 25(5): 564-72.
  4. Cresswell KM, Mozaffar H, Lee L, Williams R, Sheikh A. Safety risks associated with the lack of integration and interfacing of hospital health information technologies: a qualitative study of hospital electronic prescribing systems in England. BMJ Qual Saf. 2017; 26: 530-41.
  5. Cresswell KM, Mozaffar H, Lee L, Williams R, Sheikh A. W. Workarounds to hospital electronic prescribing systems: a qualitative study in English hospitals. BMJ Qual Saf. 2017; 26: 542-51.
  6. Lilford RJ. The WISDAM* of Rupert Fawdry. NIHR CLAHRC West Midlands News Blog. 5 September 2014.
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