Tag Archives: Gastrointestinal

Worms – Not Just Useful in the Garden

It is known that worms are ‘old infections’ and that old infections tend to manipulate their host’s immune system to their advantage – they use the immune system to hide from attack by the immune system. It is not altogether surprising, then, that worms can affect non-infective diseases. Previous research has shown infections protecting people from atopy.[1] Now it turns out that worm infestation might also offer protection against inflammatory bowel disease.[2] One possibility is that they do this by altering intestinal flora and reducing the load of bacteria that promote infection.[2] [3] Certain people who are predisposed to inflammatory bowel disease might gain protection from worm infestation.

— Richard Lilford, CLAHRC WM Director

References:

  1. Smits HH, Everts B, Hartgers FC, Yazdanbakhsh M. Chronic Helminth Infections Protect Against Allergic Diseases by Active Regulatory Processes. Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 2010; 10(1): 3-12.
  2. Ramanan D, Bowcutt R, Lee SC, et al. Helminth infection promotes colonization resistance via type 2 immunity. Science. 2016; 352(6285): 608-12.
  3. Leslie M. Parasitic worms may prevent Crohn’s disease by altering bacterial balance. Science. 24 April 2016.
Advertisements

Biological Underpinnings of Chronic Fatigue?

A recent synopsis in Nature describes a study showing that immune cells in patients with chronic fatigue behave differently in vitro to those in healthy controls.[1] This suggests that the disease is not psychosomatic, argues the synopsis. That is not just out of date thinking, it is long out of date – the inter-relationship between mind and body has been known for over a century. The article suggests that gut bacteria may differ in chronic fatigue syndrome. If this hypothesis is confirmed then maybe the condition originates somatically and affects the brain, not the other way around. We develop this idea further in the next exciting instalment of your news blog.

— Richard Lilford, CLAHRC WM Director

Reference:

  1. Maxmen A. Biological underpinnings of chronic fatigue emerge. Nature. 2017; 543: 602.

Fine Dining and Fine Hygiene are Negatively Correlated

A recent study shows that restaurants rated highly in food guides are associated with a greater overall risk of foodborne gastrointestinal diseases outbreaks than your run-of-the-mill restaurant.[1] However, the ‘high-end’ restaurants also score more highly on the Food Agency Inspection visits. So why do the posh restaurants generate more GI diseases than their more mundane peers despite better hygiene in the restaurants with the best food? The high disease risk in highly rated restaurants probably comes from the nature of the food served (e.g. oysters) and cooking methods (e.g. low temperatures to produce chicken liver parfait). So the risk is real, but worth running!

— Richard Lilford, CLAHRC WM Director

Reference:

  1. Kanagarajah S, Mook P, Crook P, Awofisayo-Okuyelu A, McCarthy N. Taste and Safety: Is the Exceptional Cuisine Offered by High End Restaurants Paralleled by High Standards of Food Safety? PLoS Curr Outbreaks. 2016.